Apollo Special Part 2! Free Astronomy Magazine – July-August 2019 Issue Available For Reading And Download

Above: Neil Armstrong taking a photo of Buzz Aldrin on the Moon(!), with Armstrong in the helmet reflection, with Buzz in the helmet reflection helmet reflection, and Armstrong in the helmet reflection helmet reflection helmet reflection… And Michael Collins. Image courtesy NASA Public Domain.

A closing quote in praise of the 400,000-ish NASA employees and contractors who made the Apollo missions and, by connection, all future missions possible:

“We would like to give special thanks to all those Americans who built the spacecraft; who did the construction, design, the tests, and put their hearts and all their abilities into those craft. To those people tonight, we give a special thank you, and to all the other people that are listening and watching tonight, God bless you. Good night from Apollo 11.” – Neil Armstrong

As part of that anniversary celebration, Michele Ferrara at Free Astronomy Magazine has worked up an excellent two-parter on the mission itself, starting with a massive article and image spread in the May-June 2019 issue (see My Announcement) and finishing in the July-August 2019 issue being announced in this post.

My upcoming NASA Solar System Ambassador lectures will be leaning heavily on both the great insights and wonderful image selections in this two-parter series, all in the hopes of having quality slides prepped and ready to go when it comes time to celebrate the 100th.

And, as always, the rest of the issue is filled with other excellent mission and astronomy/astrophysics updates.

Also, as always, please download, read, and pass along. Also, check out the many back issues at www.astropublishing.com

astropublishing.com/4FAM2019/ | Direct PDF

Click the Table of Contents image above for a full-size view. Or just go get the magazine.

Free Astronomy Magazine – March-April 2019 Issue Available For Reading And Download

Above: The quasar J043947.08+163415.7 (red) is extremely far away, and its light has been amplified by an intervening galaxy (blue) much closer to Earth. Credit: NASA, ESA, and X. Fan (University of Arizona)

The March-April 2019 issue of Free Astronomy Magazine is available for your reading and downloading pleasure.

To the several NASA and ESA highlights included in this bi-month’s issue (including a wonderful collection of Spirit and Opportunity images in celebration of Opportunity’s recent end-of-mission status announcement), Michele Ferrara has managed to both (a) make you hopeful about our future as a science-spreading civilization in the galaxy and (b) remind you how far we have to go here on Earth to improve our appreciation of that same galaxy. Hopefully, the Genesis Project (no, not really that one (but sort-of). This other one – besides this issue, see phys.org and universetoday.com) and Orbital Advertising (not going to dignify it with additional links) articles give you deep – and different – pause.

Please download, read, and pass along. Also, check out the many back issues at www.astropublishing.com

astropublishing.com/2FAM2019/ | Direct PDF

Click the Table of Contents image below for a full-size view.

Free Astronomy Magazine – September-October 2018 Issue Available For Reading And Download

Above: ESA’s Mars Express has used radar signals bounced through underground layers of ice to identify a pond of water buried below the surface. This image shows an example radar profile for one of 29 orbits over the 200 x 200 km study region in the south polar region of Mars. The bright horizontal feature at the top corresponds to the icy surface of Mars. Layers of the south polar layered deposits – layers of ice and dust – are seen to a depth of about 1.5 km. Below is a base layer that in some areas is even much brighter than the surface reflections, while in other places is rather diffuse. The brightest reflections from the base layer – close to the centre of this image – are centred around 193°E/81°S in all intersecting orbits, outlining a well-defined, 20 km wide subsurface anomaly that is interpreted as a pond of liquid water. Image Credit: ESA/NASA/JPL/ASI/Univ. Rome; R. Orosei et al 2018.

The September-October issue of Free Astronomy Magazine has been up for a few weeks now and I hope you were already aware of that from the CNY Observers post about the same.

I’m also pleased to report a promotion from contributing translator to contributing author this month with the publication of the cover story “A Possible Subglacial Lake On Mars.” For the local record, a PDF of the article (with cover and edition TOC) is available for direct download at 5FAM2018_dgallis.pdf and I can now say that my work has been published in over three languages (four, to be exact, including English, Spanish, French, and Italian).

Please download, read, and pass along. Also, check out the many back issues at www.astropublishing.com

astropublishing.com/5FAM2018/ | Direct PDF

Click the Table of Contents image below for a full-size view.