“Upstate NY Stargazing” Series At newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com – Summaries And Links For The Last Few Months

The old adage “if you want to really learn something, teach it” has been in full effect these past few months with the writing of the UNY Stargazing series for newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com (which don’t combine the comments and shares. You have to go to both!). Firstly, it is excellent practice for anyone doing astronomy outreach to try to capture all of the events and observing opportunities that a new or casual observer might find interesting – while providing enough extra detail to whet the appetites of those reading with a wikipedia tab open (which remains the go-to for astro consistently accurate astronomy information). Secondly, if helps sharpen the editorial blade – such as by not using the word “old” to qualify “adage” when you’re really trying to keep it to 2500 words.

After 11 months of articles, the UNYStargazing template is fairly matured, Stellarium has moved well into advanced topics stage, and the many astronomy clubs that have allowed their public events to be posted have all resulted in an increasingly smooth and, hopefully, informative read.

Having ignored this blog generally recently, here’s the last four months in rapid succession:

Upstate NY Stargazing in February: Lunar eclipse, Kopernik star party, ‘Dog Nights of Winter’

* newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/2017/02/upstate_ny_stargazing_in_february…

* syracuse.com/outdoors/2017/02/upstate_ny_stargazing_in_february…

Featuring a washed-out lunar eclipse and one of Larry Slosberg’s great lunar images.

Upstate NY Stargazing In March: Messier Marathon and the Lunar Occultation of Aldebaran

* syracuse.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2017/02/upstate_ny_stargazing_in_march…

* newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/2017/02/upstate_ny_stargazing_in_march…

Friend and Kopernik Astronomical Society member George Normandin provided the eye candy to start the March article, which included a discussion of Messier Objects (such as M31, M32, and M110) still long enough to get the editor’s attention (but it was about Messier Objects and sometimes you have to say stuff). The Lunar occultation of Aldebaran was pointed out to the ASRAS email list by Brad Timerson and then promoted on the CNYO website.

Upstate NY stargazing in April: Comet hunting and the Lyrid meteor shower

* newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2017/03/upstate_ny_stargazing_in_april…

* syracuse.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2017/03/upstate_ny_stargazing_in_april…

Brad Loperfido of Revette Studio and the CNYO Facebook Group had an amazing capture of Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak, M97, and M108, allowing for a final addition to the Messier Object discussion with the objects that Messier was most interested in finding – comets. The month also included a washed-out Lyrid Meteor Shower peak and a proper shout-out to astronomy.fm.

Upstate NY stargazing in May: A meteor shower and preparations for the solar eclipse

* newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/2017/05/upstate_ny_stargazing_in_may…

* syracuse.com/outdoors/2017/05/upstate_ny_stargazing_in_may…

The first in the series prepping for the great North American eclipse on August 21st of this year, featuring a NASA/SDO/AIA image (our tax dollars at work) and a continuation of the discussion of circumpolar constellations (which will get a full summary in four more articles).

Some Light Science Reading. The Constellations: Lyra

As first appeared in the July 2012 edition of the Syracuse Astronomical Society newsletter The Astronomical Chronicle.


Image generated with Starry Night Pro 6.

“The muse is upon me… bring me a small lyre!” – Caesar (via Dom DeLuise)

I have come to the conclusion that the constellation Lyra is my favorite, as it has all of the qualities one looks for in a celestial marker for a student of astronomy history, an amateur astronomer, and a part-time musician (well, drummer). Within its defined borders reside a famed double-double star system, a planetary nebula, a small globular cluster, at least one reasonable galaxy, one of the brightest stars in our night sky, a near-perfect parallelogram (if these were brighter stars, they would rival the Belt of Orion in geometric significance to terrestrial observers), one corner of the largest asterism in the night sky (the so-named Summer Triangle), and a host of other stars and dimmer objects (including even a few comets right now). This great variety of objects all lie in a small piece of property just off the band of the Milky Way and, during the summer, they are all ideally suited to near-zenith or at-zenith observing.

Continue reading “Some Light Science Reading. The Constellations: Lyra”