More On The Virtues Of VirtualBox – ACID (or AICD) Under Ubuntu 14.04 (By Way Of OpenSuse 11.2)

“Stop that!” – George Carlin

If you’ve obtained source code from an academic lab that was last developed some time ago and you spent a whole day installing libraries and symbolic links and redefining variables in your .bashrc and downgrading libraries and redefining paths and have 20 tabs open in your browser that all go to 20 different obscure error discussions on Stack Overflow and it’s late and you’re tired and you think you might not need the program after all if you do a bunch of other workaround things instead – what’s below is for you.

Academics have been developing small code for (nearly) millions of years to make their lives easier – and we all benefit when that code is made available to others (esp. when it helps in data analysis). When that code is a series of perl or python scripts, there’s generally little reason why you should have any run issues. When they call on external libraries or specific tools, generally that information is available in the README somewhere. Generally speaking, there’s no reason why a code shouldn’t work in a straightforward manner when the developer doesn’t make it known that something else needs be installed to make it work.

So, why doesn’t code A work on your linux box? A few possibilities.

Continue reading “More On The Virtues Of VirtualBox – ACID (or AICD) Under Ubuntu 14.04 (By Way Of OpenSuse 11.2)”

The EMSL Basis Set Exchange 6-31G, 6-31G(d), And 6-31G(d,p) Gaussian-Type Basis Set For CRYSTAL88/92/95/98/03/06/09/14/etc. – Conversion, Validation With Gaussian09, And Discussion

Jump to the basis sets and downloadable files here: files, 6-31G, 6-31Gd, 6-31Gdp.

If you use these results: Please drop me a line (damian@somewhereville.com), just to keep track of where this does some good. That said, you should most certainly cite the EMSL and Basis Set references at the bottom of this page.

It’s a fair bet that Sir John Pople would be the world’s most cited researcher by leaps and bounds if people properly cited their use of the basis sets he helped develop.

The full 6-31G, 6-31G(d), and 6-31G(d,p) series (yes, adding 6-31G(d) is a bit of a cheat in this list) from the EMSL Basis Set Exchange is presented here in the interest of giving the general CRYSTALXX (that’s CRYSTAL88, CRYSTAL92, CRYSTAL95, CRYSTAL98, CRYSTAL03, CRYSTAL06, CRYSTAL09, now CRYSTAL14 – providing the names here for those who might be searching by version) user a “standard set” of basis sets that are, for the most part, the same sets one does / could employ in other quantum chemistry codes (with my specific interest being the use and comparison of Gaussian and GAMESS-US in their “molecular” (non-solid-state) implementations). Members of the CRYSTAL developer team provide a number of basis sets for use with the software. While this is good, I will admit that I cannot explain why the developers chose not to include three of the four most famous basis sets in all of (all of) computational chemistry – 3-21G (upcoming), 6-31G(d,p) (presented here), and 6-311G(d,p) (also upcoming).

Continue reading “The EMSL Basis Set Exchange 6-31G, 6-31G(d), And 6-31G(d,p) Gaussian-Type Basis Set For CRYSTAL88/92/95/98/03/06/09/14/etc. – Conversion, Validation With Gaussian09, And Discussion”