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Compiling And Running GAMESS-US (1 May 2013(R1)) On 64-bit Ubuntu 12.X/13.X In SMP Mode

Saturday, April 5th, 2014

Author’s Note 1: It is my standard policy to put too much info into guides so that those who are searching for specific problems they come across will find the offending text in their searches. With luck, your “build error” search sent you here.

Author’s Note 2: It’s not as bad as it looks (I’ve included lots of output and error messages for easy searching)!

Author’s Note 3: I won’t be much help for you in diagnosing your errors, but am happy to tweak the text below if something is unclear.

Conventions: I include both the commands you type in your Terminal and some of the output from these commands, the output being where most of the errors appear that I work on in the discussion.

Input is formatted as below:

username – your username (check your prompt)
machinename – your hostname (type hostname or check your prompt)

Text you put in at the (also shown, so you see the directory structure) prompt (copy + paste should be fine)

Text you get out (for checking results and reproducing errors)

Having just recently downloaded the newest version of GAMESS-US (R1 2013), my first few passes at using it under Linux (specifically, Ubuntu 12.04) ran into a few walls that required some straightforward modifications and a little bit of system prep planning. As my first few passes before successful execution are likely the same exact problems you might have run into in your attempts to get GAMESS-US to run (after a successful compilation and linking), I’m posting my problems and solutions here.

Qualifier 1 – My concern at the moment has been to get GAMESS-US to run under 64-bit Ubuntu 12.04 on a multi-core board (ye olde symmetric multiprocessing (which I always called single multi-processor, or SMP)). While some answers may follow in what’s below, this post doesn’t cover MPI-specific builds (nothing through a router, that is). SMP is the only concern (which is to say, I likely won’t have good answers if you send along an MPI-specific question). Also, although I’m VERY interested in trying it, I’ve not yet attempted to build a GPU-capable version (but plan to in the near future).

Qualifier 2 – It is my standard policy to install apps into /opt, and my steps below will reflect that (specifically because there’s a permission issue that needs to be addressed when you first try to build components). You can default to whatever you like, but keep in mind my tweaks when you try to build your local copy.

So, with the qualifiers in mind…

1. Prepping The System (apt-get)

There are few things better than being able to apt-get everything you need to prep your machine for an install, and I’m pleased to report that the (current) process for putting the important files onto Ubuntu 12.X/13.X is easy. Assuming you’re not going the Intel / PGI / MKL route, you can do everything by installing gfortran (compiler, presently installing 4.4) and the blas and atlas math libraries.

username@machinename:~$ sudo apt-get install gfortran libblas-dev libatlas-base-dev

Note: your atlas libraries will be installed in /usr/lib64/atlas/ – this will matter when you run config.

After these finish, run the following to determine your installed gfortran version (will be asked for by the new GAMESS config)

username@machinename:~$ gfortran -dumpversion

GNU Fortran (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5.1) 4.4.3 Copyright (C) 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc. GNU Fortran comes with NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law. You may redistribute copies of GNU Fortran under the terms of the GNU General Public License. For more information about these matters, see the file named COPYING

4.4 And you’re ready for GAMESS.

2. Downloading GAMESS-US, Placing Into /opt, And Changing Permissions

First, obviously, get the GAMESS source (click on the red text).

After downloading, copy/move gamess-current.tar.gz into /opt

username@machinename:~$ cd ~/Downloads
username@machinename:~/Downloads$ sudo cp gamess-current.tar.gz /opt
username@machinename:~/Downloads$ cd /opt
username@machinename:/opt$ sudo gunzip gamess-cuerent.tar.gz
username@machinename:/opt$ sudo tar xvd gamess-current.tar

gamess/ gamess/gms-files.csh gamess/tools/ ... gamess/misc/count.code gamess/misc/vbdum.src gamess/Makefile.in

At this point, if you go through the config process and get to the point of building ddikick.x, you will get an error when you first try to run ./compddi

username@machinename:/opt/gamess/ddi$ sudo ./compddi >& compddi.log &
[1] 4622 -bash: compddi.log: Permission denied

The problem is with the permission of the entire gamess folder:

drwxr-xr-x  4 root        root              4096 2014-04-04 21:43 . drwxr-xr-x 22 root        root              4096 2013-12-27 16:17 .. drwxr-xr-x 14 1300 504              4096 2014-04-04 21:43 gamess -rw-r--r-- 1 root        root         198481920 2014-04-04 21:42 gamess-current.tar

Which you remedy before running into this error by changing the permissions:

username@machinename:/opt$ sudo chown -R username gamess

The next step is recommended when you run config, so I’m performing the step here to get it out of the way. With the atlas libraries installed, generate two symbolic links.

username@machinename:/opt$ cd /usr/lib64/atlas
username@machinename:/usr/lib64/atlas$ sudo ln -s libf77blas.so.3.0 libf77blas.so
username@machinename:/usr/lib64/atlas$ sudo ln -s libatlas.so.3.0 libatlas.so

And, at this point, you’re ready to run the new (well, new to me) config script that preps your system install.

3. Building GAMESS-US

Back to the GAMESS-US folder.

username@machinename:/usr/lib64/atlas$ cd /opt/gamess
username@machinename:/opt/gamess$ sudo ./config
This script asks a few questions, depending on your computer system, to set up compiler names, libraries, message passing libraries, and so forth. You can quit at any time by pressing control-C, and then . Please open a second window by logging into your target machine, in case this script asks you to 'type' a command to learn something about your system software situation. All such extra questions will use the word 'type' to indicate it is a command for the other window. After the new window is open, please hit to go on.

You can open that second window or blindly assume that what I include below is all you need.

[enter]

GAMESS can compile on the following 32 bit or 64 bit machines: axp64 - Alpha chip, native compiler, running Tru64 or Linux cray-xt - Cray's massively parallel system, running CNL hpux32 - HP PA-RISC chips (old models only), running HP-UX hpux64 - HP Intel or PA-RISC chips, running HP-UX ibm32 - IBM (old models only), running AIX ibm64 - IBM, Power3 chip or newer, running AIX or Linux ibm64-sp - IBM SP parallel system, running AIX ibm-bg - IBM Blue Gene (P or L model), these are 32 bit systems linux32 - Linux (any 32 bit distribution), for x86 (old systems only) linux64 - Linux (any 64 bit distribution), for x86_64 or ia64 chips AMD/Intel chip Linux machines are sold by many companies mac32 - Apple Mac, any chip, running OS X 10.4 or older mac64 - Apple Mac, any chip, running OS X 10.5 or newer sgi32 - Silicon Graphics Inc., MIPS chip only, running Irix sgi64 - Silicon Graphics Inc., MIPS chip only, running Irix sun32 - Sun ultraSPARC chips (old models only), running Solaris sun64 - Sun ultraSPARC or Opteron chips, running Solaris win32 - Windows 32-bit (Windows XP, Vista, 7, Compute Cluster, HPC Edition) win64 - Windows 64-bit (Windows XP, Vista, 7, Compute Cluster, HPC Edition) winazure - Windows Azure Cloud Platform running Windows 64-bit type 'uname -a' to partially clarify your computer's flavor. please enter your target machine name:

We’re doing a linux64 build, so type the following at the prompt:

linux64
Where is the GAMESS software on your system? A typical response might be /u1/mike/gamess, most probably the correct answer is /opt/gamess GAMESS directory? [/opt/gamess]

Who is this mike and where is my folder u1? We’ll get to that in rungms. For now, I’m installing in /opt, so the default directory is fine:

[enter]

Setting up GAMESS compile and link for GMS_TARGET=linux64 GAMESS software is located at GMS_PATH=/opt/gamess Please provide the name of the build locaation. This may be the same location as the GAMESS directory. GAMESS build directory? [/opt/gamess]

Fine as selected.

[enter]

Please provide a version number for the GAMESS executable. This will be used as the middle part of the binary's name, for example: gamess.00.x Version? [00]

Is this important? Maybe, if you plan on building multiple versions of GAMESS-US (you might want a GPU-friendly version, one with a different compiler, one with MPI, etc.). Number as you wish and remember the number when it comes to rungms. That said, the actual linking step seems to really want to produce a 01 version (we’ll get to that). Meantime, default value is fine.

[enter]

Linux offers many choices for FORTRAN compilers, including the GNU compiler set ('g77' in old versions of Linux, or 'gfortran' in current versions), which are included for free in Unix distributions. There are also commercial compilers, namely Intel's 'ifort', Portland Group's 'pgfortran', and Pathscale's 'pathf90'. The last two are not common, and aren't as well tested as the others. type 'rpm -aq | grep gcc' to check on all GNU compilers, including gcc type 'which gfortran' to look for GNU's gfortran (a very good choice), type 'which g77' to look for GNU's g77, type 'which ifort' to look for Intel's compiler, type 'which pgfortran' to look for Portland Group's compiler, type 'which pathf90' to look for Pathscale's compiler. Please enter your choice of FORTRAN:

We’re using gfortran (currently 4.4.3):

gfortran

gfortran is very robust, so this is a wise choice. Please type 'gfortran -dumpversion' or else 'gfortran -v' to detect the version number of your gfortran. This reply should be a string with at least two decimal points, such as 4.1.2 or 4.6.1, or maybe even 4.4.2-12. The reply may be labeled as a 'gcc' version, but it is really your gfortran version. Please enter only the first decimal place, such as 4.1 or 4.6:
4.4

Alas, your version of gfortran does not support REAL*16, so relativistic integrals cannot use quadruple precision. Other than this, everything will work properly. hit to continue to the math library setup.

If this was my biggest concern I’d be a happy quantum chemist. Obviously you can try to install other flavors of gfortran and, possibly, by the time you need the procedure I’m following, a newer version of gfortran will be apt-gotten.

[enter]

Linux distributions do not include a standard math library. There are several reasonable add-on library choices, MKL from Intel for 32 or 64 bit Linux (very fast) ACML from AMD for 32 or 64 bit Linux (free) ATLAS from www.rpmfind.net for 32 or 64 bit Linux (free) and one very unreasonable option, namely 'none', which will use some slow FORTRAN routines supplied with GAMESS. Choosing 'none' will run MP2 jobs 2x slower, or CCSD(T) jobs 5x slower. Some typical places (but not the only ones) to find math libraries are Type 'ls /opt/intel/mkl' to look for MKL Type 'ls /opt/intel/Compiler/mkl' to look for MKL Type 'ls /opt/intel/composerxe/mkl' to look for MKL Type 'ls -d /opt/acml*' to look for ACML Type 'ls -d /usr/local/acml*' to look for ACML Type 'ls /usr/lib64/atlas' to look for Atlas Enter your choice of 'mkl' or 'atlas' or 'acml' or 'none':
atlas

Where is your Atlas math library installed? A likely place is /usr/lib64/atlas Please enter the Atlas subdirectory on your system:

Our location is, in fact, /usr/lib64/atlas, so we type it in accordingly.

NOTE: If you don’t type anything but [enter] below, the script closes (/usr/lib64/atlas is listed as the expected location, but it is not defaulted by the script. You need to type it in.

/usr/lib64/atlas
 
The linking step in GAMESS assumes that a softlink exists within the system's /usr/lib64/atlas from libatlas.so to a specific file like libatlas.so.3.0 from libf77blas.so to a specific file like libf77blas.so.3.0 config can carry on for the moment, but the 'root' user should chdir /usr/lib64/atlas ln -s libf77blas.so.3.0 libf77blas.so ln -s libatlas.so.3.0 libatlas.so prior to the linking of GAMESS to a binary executable. Math library 'atlas' will be taken from /usr/lib64/atlas please hit to compile the GAMESS source code activator

The symbolic linking was performed before the GAMESS steps.

[enter]

gfortran -o /home/username/gamess/tools/actvte.x actvte.f unset echo Source code activator was successfully compiled. please hit to set up your network for Linux clusters.
[enter]

If you have a slow network, like Gigabit Ethernet (GE), or if you have so few nodes you won't run extensively in parallel, or if you have no MPI library installed, or if you want a fail-safe compile/link and easy execution, choose 'sockets' to use good old reliable standard TCP/IP networking. If you have an expensive but fast network like Infiniband (IB), and if you have an MPI library correctly installed, choose 'mpi'. communication library ('sockets' or 'mpi')?

Again, I’m not building an mpi-friendly version, so am using sockets.

sockets

64 bit Linux builds can attach a special LIBCCHEM code for fast MP2 and CCSD(T) runs. The LIBCCHEM code can utilize nVIDIA GPUs, through the CUDA libraries, if GPUs are available. Usage of LIBCCHEM requires installation of HDF5 I/O software as well. GAMESS+LIBCCHEM binaries are unable to run most of GAMESS computations, and are a bit harder to create due to the additional CUDA/HDF5 software. Therefore, the first time you run 'config', the best answer is 'no'! If you decide to try LIBCCHEM later, just run this 'config' again. Do you want to try LIBCCHEM? (yes/no):
no

Your configuration for GAMESS compilation is now in /home/username/gamess/install.info Now, please follow the directions in /home/username/gamess/machines/readme.unix username@machinename:~/gamess$

At this stage, you’re ready to build ddikick.x and continue with the compiling.

4. Build ddikick.x

username@machinename:/opt/gamess$ cd ddi
username@machinename:/opt/gamess/ddi$ sudo ./compddi >& compddi.log &

Will dump output into compddi.log (which will now work with the correct permissions).

username@machinename:/opt/gamess/ddi$ sudo mv ddikick.x ..
username@machinename:/opt/gamess/ddi$ cd ..
username@machinename:/opt/gamess$ sudo ./compall >& compall.log &

Feel free to follow along as compall.log dumps results. You’re also welcome to follow the readme.unix advice:

This takes a while, so go for coffee, or check the SF Giants web page.

Upon completion, the last step is to link the executable.

Now, it used to be the case that you specified the version number in the lked step. So, if you wanted to stick with the 00 version from the config file, you’d type

username@machinename:/opt/gamess$ sudo ./lked gamess 00 >& lked.log &

When you do that at present, you get

[1] 7626 username@machinename:/opt/gamess$ [1]+ Stopped sudo ./lked gamess 00 &>lked.log

This then leads you to use the lked call from the readme.unix file.

username@machinename:/opt/gamess$ sudo ./lked gamess 01 >& lked.log &

Which then produces lked.log and gamess.01.x.

Now, if you run with 00 again, you get a successful linking of gamess.00.x . Not sure why this happens, but the version number isn’t important so long as you specify the right one when you use rungms (so I’ve not diagnosed it further).

At this point, you have a gamess.00.x and/or gamess.01.x executable in your /opt/gamess folder:

30828747 2014-04-04 22:41 gamess.01.x

I’m going to ignore the 00 issue out of the config file and use the gamess.01.x executable.

We’re ready to run calculations and work through the next set of errors you’ll receive if you don’t properly modify files.

5. PATH Setting

First, we copy rungms to our home folder, then add /opt/gamess to the PATH:

username@machinename:/opt/gamess$ cp rungms ~/
username@machinename:/opt/gamess$ cd ~/
username@machinename:~$ nano .bashrc

Add the following to the bottom of .bashrc (or extend your PATH)

PATH=$PATH:/opt/gamess

Quit nano and source.

username@machinename:~$ source .bashrc
[OPTIONAL] username@machinename:~$ echo $PATH
/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:.../opt/gamess:

6. rungms (Probably Why You’re Here)

If you just go blindly into a run, you’ll get the following error:

username@machinename:~$ ./rungms test.inp

----- GAMESS execution script 'rungms' ----- This job is running on host machinename under operating system Linux at Fri Apr 4 22:47:55 EDT 2014 Available scratch disk space (Kbyte units) at beginning of the job is df: `/scr/username': No such file or directory df: no file systems processed GAMESS temporary binary files will be written to /scr/username GAMESS supplementary output files will be written to /home/username/scr Copying input file test.inp to your run's scratch directory... cp test.inp /scr/username/test.F05 cp: cannot create regular file `/scr/username/test.F05': No such file or directory unset echo /u1/mike/gamess/gms-files.csh: No such file or directory.

As is obvious, rungms needs some modifying.

username@machinename:~$ nano rungms

Scroll down until you see the following:

set TARGET=sockets set SCR=/scr/$USER set USERSCR=~$USER/scr set GMSPATH=/u1/mike/gamess

Given that it’s just me on the machine, I tend to simplify this by making SCR and USERSCR the same directory, and I make them both /tmp. If you intend on keeping all of the files, you’ll need to make rungms specific for each run case. My only concerns are .dat and .log, so /tmp dumping is fine. Furthermore, we must change GMSPATH from how the ever-helpful Mike Schmidt (he got me through some early issues when I started my GAMESS-US adventure 15ish years ago. Won’t complain about his continued default-ed presence in the scripts) has it set up at Iowa to how we want it on our own machines (in my case, /opt/gamess)

set TARGET=sockets set SCR=/tmp set USERSCR=/tmp set GMSPATH=/opt/gamess

With these modifications, your next run will be a bit more successful:

username@machinename:~$ ./rungms test.inp

----- GAMESS execution script 'rungms' ----- This job is running on host machinename under operating system Linux at Fri Apr 4 22:51:35 EDT 2014 Available scratch disk space (Kbyte units) at beginning of the job is Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/sda2 1905222596 249225412 1559217460 14% / GAMESS temporary binary files will be written to /tmp GAMESS supplementary output files will be written to /tmp Copying input file test.inp to your run's scratch directory... cp test.inp /tmp/test.F05 unset echo /opt/gamess/ddikick.x /opt/gamess/gamess.00.x test -ddi 1 1 machinename -scr /tmp Distributed Data Interface kickoff program. Initiating 1 compute processes on 1 nodes to run the following command: /opt/gamess/gamess.00.x test ****************************************************** * GAMESS VERSION = 1 MAY 2013 (R1) * * FROM IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY * * M.W.SCHMIDT, K.K.BALDRIDGE, J.A.BOATZ, S.T.ELBERT, * * M.S.GORDON, J.H.JENSEN, S.KOSEKI, N.MATSUNAGA, * * K.A.NGUYEN, S.J.SU, T.L.WINDUS, * * TOGETHER WITH M.DUPUIS, J.A.MONTGOMERY * * J.COMPUT.CHEM. 14, 1347-1363(1993) * **************** 64 BIT LINUX VERSION **************** ... INPUT CARD> DDI Process 0: shmget returned an error. Error EINVAL: Attempting to create 160525768 bytes of shared memory. Check system limits on the size of SysV shared memory segments. The file ~/gamess/ddi/readme.ddi contains information on how to display the current SystemV memory settings, and how to increase their sizes. Increasing the setting requires the root password, and usually a sytem reboot. DDI Process 0: error code 911 ddikick.x: application process 0 quit unexpectedly. ddikick.x: Fatal error detected. The error is most likely to be in the application, so check for input errors, disk space, memory needs, application bugs, etc. ddikick.x will now clean up all processes, and exit... ddikick.x: Sending kill signal to DDI processes. ddikick.x: Execution terminated due to error(s). unset echo ----- accounting info ----- Files used on the master node machinename were: -rw-r--r-- 1 username username 0 2014-04-04 22:51 /tmp/test.dat -rw-r--r-- 1 username username 1341 2014-04-04 22:51 /tmp/test.F05 ls: No match. ls: No match. ls: No match. Fri Apr 4 22:51:36 EDT 2014 0.0u 0.0s 0:01.08 9.2% 0+0k 0+8io 0pf+0w

Things worked, but with a memory error. This issue is discussed at the Baldridge Group wiki: ocikbapps.uzh.ch/kbwiki/gamess_troubleshooting.html

From the wiki:

If you are sure you are not asking for too much memory in the input file, check that your kernel parameters are not allowing enough memory to be requested. You might have to increase the SHMALL & SHMAX kernel memory values to allow GAMESS to run. (See http://www.pythian.com/news/245/the-mysterious-world-of-shmmax-and-shmall/ for a better explanation.)
For example, on a machine with 4GB of memory, you might add these to /etc/sysctl.conf:
# cat /etc/sysctl.conf | grep shm
kernel.shmmax = 3064372224
kernel.shmall = 748137
Then set the new settings like so:
# sysctl -p
Since they are in /etc/sysctl.conf, they will automatically be set each time the system is booted.

In our case, we modify sysctl.conf with the recommendations from the wiki:

username@machinename:~$ sudo nano /etc/sysctl.conf

Add the following to the bottom of the file:

kernel.shmmax = 3064372224 kernel.shmall = 748137

Save and exit.

username@machinename:~$ sudo sysctl -p

net.ipv4.ip_forward = 1 kernel.shmmax = 3064372224 kernel.shmall = 748137

These memory values will change depending on your system.

Now we empty the /tmp and rerun.

username@machinename:~$ rm /tmp/*
username@machinename:~$ ./rungms test.inp

If your input file is worth it’s salt, you’ll have successfully run your file on a single processor (single core, that is). If you run into additional memory errors, increase kernel.shmmax and kernel.shmall.

Now, onto the SMP part. My first attempt to run games in parallel (on 4 cores using version 00) produced the following error:

username@machinename:~$ rm /tmp/*
username@machinename:~$ ./rungms test.inp 00 4

----- GAMESS execution script 'rungms' ----- This job is running on host machinename under operating system Linux at Fri Apr 4 22:52:52 EDT 2014 Available scratch disk space (Kbyte units) at beginning of the job is Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/sda2 1905222596 249225416 1559217456 14% / GAMESS temporary binary files will be written to /tmp GAMESS supplementary output files will be written to /tmp Copying input file test.inp to your run's scratch directory... cp test.inp /tmp/test.F05 unset echo I do not know how to run this node in parallel.

I tried a number of stupid things to get the run to work, finally settling on modifying the rungms file properly. To make gamess know how to run the node in parallel, we need only make the following changes to our rungms file.

username@machinename:~$ nano rungms

Scroll down until you find the section below:

# 2. This is an example of how to run on a multi-core SMP enclosure, # where all CPUs (aka COREs) are inside a -single- NODE. # At other locations, you may wish to consider some of the examples # that follow below, after commenting out this ISU specific part. if ($NCPUS > 1) then switch (`hostname`) case se.msg.chem.iastate.edu: case sb.msg.chem.iastate.edu: if ($NCPUS > 2) set NCPUS=4 set NNODES=1

The change is simple. We remove the cases for $NCPUS > 1 in the file and add the hostname of our linux box (and if you don’t know this or it’s not in your prompt, simply type hostname at the prompt first). We’ll disable the two cases listed and add our hostname to the case list.

# 2. This is an example of how to run on a multi-core SMP enclosure, # where all CPUs (aka COREs) are inside a -single- NODE. # At other locations, you may wish to consider some of the examples # that follow below, after commenting out this ISU specific part. if ($NCPUS > 1) then switch (`hostname`) case machinename: # case se.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case sb.msg.chem.iastate.edu: if ($NCPUS > 2) set NCPUS=4 set NNODES=1

This gives you parallel functionality, but it’s still not using the machine resources (cores) correctly when I ask for anything more than 2 cores (always using only 2 cores).

[minor complaint]
Admittedly, I don’t immediately get the logic of this section as currently coded, as one cannot get more than 2 cores to work in this case given how the if statements are written (so far as I can see now. I will assume I am the one missing something but have not decided to ask about it, instead changing the rungms text to the following). You can check this yourself by running top in another window. This is the most simple modification, and assumes you want to run N number of cores each time. Clearly, you can make this more elegant than it is (my modification, that is). Meantime, I want to run 4 cores on this machine, so I change the section to reflect a 4-core board (and commented out much of this section).
[/complaint]

# 2. This is an example of how to run on a multi-core SMP enclosure, # where all CPUs (aka COREs) are inside a -single- NODE. # At other locations, you may wish to consider some of the examples # that follow below, after commenting out this ISU specific part. if ($NCPUS > 1) then switch (`hostname`) case machinename # case se.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case sb.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # if ($NCPUS > 2) set NCPUS=2 # set NNODES=1 # set HOSTLIST=(`hostname`:cpus=$NCPUS) # breaksw # case machinename # case br.msg.chem.iastate.edu: if ($NCPUS >= 4) set NCPUS=4 set NNODES=1 set HOSTLIST=(`hostname`:cpus=$NCPUS) breaksw case machinename # case cd.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case zn.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case ni.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case co.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case pb.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case bi.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case po.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case at.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case sc.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # if ($NCPUS > 4) set NCPUS=4 # set NNODES=1 # set HOSTLIST=(`hostname`:cpus=$NCPUS) # breaksw # case ga.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case ge.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # case gd.msg.chem.iastate.edu: # if ($NCPUS > 6) set NCPUS=6 # set NNODES=1 # set HOSTLIST=(`hostname`:cpus=$NCPUS) # breaksw default: echo I do not know how to run this node in parallel. exit 20 endsw endif #

And, with this set of changes, I’m using all 4 cores on the board (but have some significant memory issues when running MP2 calks. But that’s for another post).

The typical user will never be able to do what the GAMESS group has done in making an excellent program that also happens to be free. That said, the need to make changes to the rungms file is something that would be greatly simplified by having N number of rungms scripts for each case instead of a monolithic file that is mostly useless text to users not using one of the system types. This, for instance, would make rungms modification much easier. If I streamline rungms for my specific system, I may post a new file accordingly.

Experimental And Theoretical Studies Of Tetramethoxy-p-benzoquinone: Infrared Spectra, Structural And Lithium Insertion Properties

Friday, December 20th, 2013

Published earlier this year in RSC Advances (RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 19081-19096), a follow-up (for my part) to the study The Low-/Room-temperature Forms Of The Lithiated Salt Of 3,6-dihydroxy-2,5-dimethoxy-p-benzoquinone: A Combined Experimental And Dispersion-Corrected Density Functional Study in CrystEngComm last year. The theoretical section for this paper is a tour-de-force of Crystal09 solid-state optimizations, density functional and dispersion-correction dependence, and post-processing using Carlo Gotti’s TOPOND software. In brief, the combination of vibrational spectra, electochemical measurements, and solid-state density functional theory tests are used to predict the structure of the previously unknown lithiated tetramethoxy-p-benzoquinone structure based on the good-to-excellent agreement with two known TMQ crystal structures (the testing of density functionals and dispersion corrections being a very good survey of the pros and cons of the varied methods. If you were pondering an approach to follow to perform the same kind of theoretical analysis, the procedure set up by Gaëtan and Christine in this paper is fully worth your consideration).

2013dec20_rscadvances

Gaëtan Bonnard, Anne-Lise Barrès, Yann Danten, Damian G. Allis, Olivier Mentré, Daniele Tomerini, Carlo Gatti, Ekaterina I. Izgorodina, Philippe Poizot and Christine Frayret*

In the search for low-polluting electrode materials for batteries, the use of redox-active organic compounds represents a promising alternative to conventional metal-based systems. In this article we report a combined experimental and theoretical study of tetramethoxy-p-benzoquinone (TMQ). In carbonate-based electrolytes, electrochemical behaviour of this compound is characterized by a reversible insertion process located at approximately 2.85 V vs. Li+/Li0. This relatively high potential reactivity, coupled with our effort to develop computational methodologies in the field of organic electrode materials, prompted us to complement these experimental data with theoretical studies performed using density functional theory (DFT). Single crystals of TMQ were synthesized and thoroughly characterized showing that this quinonic species crystallised in the P21/n space group. The experimental crystal structure of TMQ was then used to assess various DFT methods. The structural features and vibrational spectra were thus predicted by using as a whole five common density functionals (PBE, LDA, revPBE, PBEsol, B3PW91) with and without a semi-empirical correction to account for the van der Waals interactions using either Grimme’s (DFT-D2) or Tkatchenko–Scheffler (TS) scheme. The most reliable combination of the DFT functional and the explicit dispersion correction was chosen to study the Li-intercalated molecular crystal (LiTMQ) with the view of indentifying Li insertion sites. A very close agreement with the experiment was found for the average voltage by using the most stable relaxed hypothetical LiTMQ structure. Additionally, a comparison of vibrational spectra gained either for TMQ molecule and its dimer in gas phase or through periodic calculation was undertaken with respect to the experimentally measured infrared spectra. The topological features of the bonds were also investigated in conjunction with estimates of net atomic charges to gain insight into the effect of chemical bonding and intermolecular interaction on Li intercalation. Finally, π-electron delocalization of both quinone and alkali salts of p-semiquinone were determined using the Harmonic Oscillator model of Aromaticity (HOMA) or aromatic fluctuation index (FLU) calculations.

Commensurate Urea Inclusion Crystals With The Guest (E,E)‐1,4-Diiodo-1,3-Butadiene

Friday, December 20th, 2013

Published in Crystal Growth & Design (Cryst. Growth Des., 2013, 13 (9), pp. 3852–3855) earlier this year. The theory work is less impressive than the successful crystal growth, with initial solid-state efforts in Crystal09 only very recently now producing good results (leaving the molecular calculations to Gaussian09 in this paper). The procedure leading to the observed crystal structure of this inclusion complex is a significant step in the direction of testing the theory proposed in Bond Alternation In Infinite Periodic Polyacetylene: Dynamical Treatment Of The Anharmonic Potential published earlier this year in J. Mol. Struct.

2013dec20_DIBD_UIC

Caption: Two views along the ba and ca crystal axes of the (E,E)‐1,4-Diiodo-1,3-Butadiene : Urea Inclusion Complex.

Amanda F. Lashua, Tiffany M. Smith, Hegui Hu, Lihui Wei, Damian G. Allis, Michael B. Sponsler, and Bruce S. Hudson

Abstract: The urea inclusion compound (UIC) with (E,E)-1,4-diiodo-1,3-butadiene (DIBD) as a guest (DIBD:UIC) has been prepared and crystallographically characterized at 90 and 298 K as a rare example of a commensurate, fully ordered UIC. The crystal shows nearly hexagonal channels in the monoclinic space group P21/n. The DIBD guest molecules are arranged end-to-end with the nonbonding iodine atoms in the van der Waals contact. The guest structure is compared with that for DIBD at 90 K and with computations for the periodic UIC and isolated DIBD molecule.

Compiling LAMMPS (3Apr13, But Likely Others) In Ubuntu 10.04 Part 1. Using MPICH2 And FFTW2 (And Ubuntu Notes On Installing Intel Fortran And C++ Composers XE for Linux)

Saturday, April 6th, 2013

I’ll qualify this post by saying that (1) I have given up on Ubuntu 11.x and 12.x because they are consistently unstable on my hardware (so, if you have issues running this installation on those versions, I may not be of much help (although I suspect things should work)), (2) I am starting this install from a fresh 32-bit Desktop Ubuntu 10.04 install (so do not know if there are any issues with other software one might have installed on a Linux box if a problem comes up), and (3) the procedure comes out of the current lack of an Ubuntu binary currently listed as available (as of 6 April 2013) from the LAMMPS website (lammps.sandia.gov/download.html#ubuntu). If (3) changes and is available in an MPI form, what’s below will hopefully be unnecessary.

Building Trouble And Solutions

My initial “just unzip, untar, and make linux” attempt on a fresh 10.04 install produced the following error (which I’m reproducing in the expectation that you found this page by typing one of the errors below into a search engine, so you’ll find the error and the solutions). NOTE: I build all my programs in /opt for organizational purposes (so replace accordingly):

user@machine:/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src$ sudo make linux

make[1]: Entering directory `/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src/Obj_linux'
icc -O -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../write_restart.cpp > write_restart.d
/bin/sh: icc: not found
icc -O -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../write_data.cpp > write_data.d
/bin/sh: icc: not found
icc -O -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../verlet.cpp > verlet.d
/bin/sh: icc: not found
icc -O -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../velocity.cpp > velocity.d
/bin/sh: icc: not found
...
icc -O -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../angle_charmm.cpp > angle_charmm.d
/bin/sh: icc: not found
icc -O  -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -c ../angle_charmm.cpp
make[1]: icc: Command not found
make[1]: *** [angle_charmm.o] Error 127
make[1]: Leaving directory `/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src/Obj_linux'
make: *** [linux] Error 2

Obviously, problem Number 1 is the lack of the Intel C Compiler (icc). My solution to this was to download the non-commercial version of the Intel C++ Composer XE for Linux (then I grabbed the Intel Fortran Composer XE for Linux because, well, why not?) currently available from software.intel.com/en-us/non-commercial-software-development (which means this link may be subject to change, so search for “intel c++ noncommercial” in the event).

Unzipping, untaring, and running ./install.sh will, on a fresh Ubuntu install, give you errors that g++ and a proper Java runtime environment are not available on the computer (as part of the pre-requisite search). This is easily solved before the Intel installs by the following (one of which is needed for LAMMPS anyway). I specifically chose the openJDK, but Java 6 or 7 should also do.

sudo apt-get install build-essential openjdk-6-*

After these installs, both Intel Composers should install just fine. If you’re installing LAMMPS into a directory that you, the user, has access to, then adding /opt/intel/bin to your PATH will provide you no compiler errors (related to location). If you attempt to install LAMMPS in a directory you, the user, do not have access to, you have to run the install with sudo, which then doesn’t likely have the /opt/intel/bin directory in the root PATH, in which case the solution is simply to add a symbolic link for icc into /user/local/bin.

sudo ln -s /opt/intel/bin/icc /usr/local/bin

With icc accessible, running another sudo make linux produces the following errors:

sudo make clean-all
sudo make linux

make[1]: Entering directory `/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src/Obj_linux'
icc -O -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../write_restart.cpp > write_restart.d
../write_restart.cpp(15): catastrophic error: cannot open source file "mpi.h"
  #include "mpi.h"
                  ^

icc -O -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../write_data.cpp > write_data.d
../write_data.cpp(15): catastrophic error: cannot open source file "mpi.h"
  #include "mpi.h"
                  ^
...

icc -O  -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -c ../angle_charmm.cpp
../pointers.h(25): catastrophic error: cannot open source file "mpi.h"
  #include "mpi.h"
                  ^

compilation aborted for ../angle_charmm.cpp (code 4)
make[1]: *** [angle_charmm.o] Error 4
make[1]: Leaving directory `/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src/Obj_linux'
make: *** [linux] Error 2

The new problem is now an MPI problem, requiring the installation of (as recommended from the LAMMPS linux Makefile) MPICH. Reading the Makefile (you mean you didn’t check this first?) also indicates the need for FFTW2. We can install all of the needed files in one shot with apt-get (and I include build-essential here for completeness, as you either did or didn’t install it while trying to solve the icc problem above).

sudo apt-get install build-essential mpich-bin libmpich1.0-dev mpi-doc fftw2 fftw-dev libxaw7-dev libmpich2-dev

This still does not solve the mpi.h issue above, which is a problem with the settings in Makefile.linux (which, apparently, are not Ubuntu-compatible). The solution is, and this is why this is Part 1, to change Makefile.linux to make it compatible with the mpicc compiler in Ubuntu (I will attempt to get it working with icc next). The tweak to my Makefile.linux is provided below (an amalgam of some other Makefile settings. Comment out or delete what’s there and add the sections without the “#” to the file):

#######################################################################
## My modified settings are below:

CC = mpicxx
CCFLAGS = -O -DFFT_FFTW -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DMPICH_IGNORE_CXX_SEEK
DEPFLAGS =	-M

LINK = $(CC)
LINKFLAGS = -O
SIZE = size

USRLIB = -lfftw

ARCHIVE =	ar
ARFLAGS =	-rc

#######################################################################
## Comment the following out or delete them:

# CC =		icc
# CCFLAGS =	-O
# SHFLAGS =	-fPIC
# DEPFLAGS =	-M

# LINK =		icc
# LINKFLAGS =	-O
# LIB =           -lstdc++
# SIZE =		size

# ARCHIVE =	ar
# ARFLAGS =	-rc
# SHLIBFLAGS =	-shared

I will say that, in some of my searches, I found reference to the use of USRLIB -lmpi. If this is included in the Makefile.linux, you will get the following error upon mpicc (MPICH2) compilation:

/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lmpl
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
make[1]: *** [../lmp_linux] Error 1
make[1]: Leaving directory `/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src/Obj_linux'
make: *** [linux] Error 2

So, don’t include -lmpi.

With the above Makefile modifications, building of LAMMPS seems to go quite well until the following error is produced:

mpicxx -O -DFFT_FFTW -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DMPICH_IGNORE_CXX_SEEK  -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -c ../dump_dcd.cpp
mpicxx -O -DFFT_FFTW -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DMPICH_IGNORE_CXX_SEEK  -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -c ../dump_image.cpp
../dump_image.cpp:32:21: error: jpeglib.h: No such file or directory
../dump_image.cpp: In member function ‘virtual int LAMMPS_NS::DumpImage::modify_param(int, char**)':
../dump_image.cpp:904: warning: suggest parentheses around assignment used as truth value
../dump_image.cpp:911: warning: suggest parentheses around assignment used as truth value
../dump_image.cpp:964: warning: suggest parentheses around assignment used as truth value
../dump_image.cpp:971: warning: suggest parentheses around assignment used as truth value
../dump_image.cpp: In member function ‘void LAMMPS_NS::DumpImage::create_image()':
../dump_image.cpp:611: warning: ‘diameter' may be used uninitialized in this function
../dump_image.cpp:612: warning: ‘color' may be used uninitialized in this function
../dump_image.cpp:612: warning: ‘color1' may be used uninitialized in this function
../dump_image.cpp:612: warning: ‘color2' may be used uninitialized in this function
make[1]: *** [dump_image.o] Error 1
make[1]: Leaving directory `/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src/Obj_linux'
make: *** [linux] Error 2

The jpeglib.h error can likely be solved by installing only one of the libraries below, but I didn’t bother to identify which one, instead indiscriminately installing a whole set based on the recommendation of dev.xonotic.org/projects/xonotic/wiki/Repository_Access (having found this link at forums.xonotic.org/showthread.php?tid=1252 – but I removed some of the install that I’m sure was not needed):

sudo apt-get install libxxf86dga-dev libxcb-xf86dri0-dev libxpm-dev libxxf86vm-dev libsdl1.2-dev libsdl-image1.2-dev libclalsadrv-dev libasound2-dev libxext-dev

Finally, a successful build!

make[1]: Entering directory `/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src/Obj_linux'
mpicxx -O -DFFT_FFTW -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DMPICH_IGNORE_CXX_SEEK -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../write_restart.cpp > write_restart.d
mpicxx -O -DFFT_FFTW -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DMPICH_IGNORE_CXX_SEEK -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../write_data.cpp > write_data.d
mpicxx -O -DFFT_FFTW -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DMPICH_IGNORE_CXX_SEEK -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../verlet.cpp > verlet.d
mpicxx -O -DFFT_FFTW -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DMPICH_IGNORE_CXX_SEEK -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../velocity.cpp > velocity.d
mpicxx -O -DFFT_FFTW -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DMPICH_IGNORE_CXX_SEEK -DLAMMPS_GZIP -DLAMMPS_JPEG  -DMPICH_SKIP_MPICXX  -DFFT_FFTW   -M ../variable.cpp > variable.d
…
write_data.o write_restart.o  -lmpich -lpthread -lfftw -ljpeg   -o ../lmp_linux
size ../lmp_linux
   text	   data	    bss	    dec	    hex	filename
3654398	   6928	    264	3661590	 37df16	../lmp_linux
make[1]: Leaving directory `/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src/Obj_linux'

At this point, you can move the lmp_linux executable anywhere (or, as I find myself doing, just keep it in the lammps-DATE/src folder for when you perform subsequent builds).

Running An MPI Calculations

If you’ve never run through an MPI calculation, you’ll get the following errors when you first try to run lmp_linux:

cannot connect to local mpd (/tmp/mpd2.console_user); possible causes:
  1. no mpd is running on this host
  2. an mpd is running but was started without a "console" (-n option)
In case 1, you can start an mpd on this host with:
    mpd &
and you will be able to run jobs just on this host.
For more details on starting mpds on a set of hosts, see
the MPICH2 Installation Guide.

**********

user@machine:/opt/lammps-3Apr13/src$ mpd &

configuration file /home/damianallis/.mpd.conf not found
A file named .mpd.conf file must be present in the user's home
directory (/etc/mpd.conf if root) with read and write access
only for the user, and must contain at least a line with:
MPD_SECRETWORD=
One way to safely create this file is to do the following:
  cd $HOME
  touch .mpd.conf
  chmod 600 .mpd.conf
and then use an editor to insert a line like
  MPD_SECRETWORD=mr45-j9z
into the file.  (Of course use some other secret word than mr45-j9z.)

[1]+  Exit 255                mpd

Simply follow the instructions to put a .mdp.conf in your ~/ folder, start mpd with “mpd &,” and run LAMMPS with the following command below (which uses 2 cores (-np 2)).

NOTE: My LAMMPS test (being brand new to it) was to run the first test available from icme.hpc.msstate.edu/mediawiki/index.php/LAMMPS_Help. Following the instructions therein (DOWNLOAD: Al99.eam.alloy (780 KB) and calc_fcc.in (1 KB)):

sudo mpirun -np 2 ./lmp_linux < calc_fcc.in

Which should produce the following output:

LAMMPS (3 Apr 2013)
Lattice spacing in x,y,z = 4 4 4
Created orthogonal box = (0 0 0) to (4 4 4)
  1 by 1 by 2 MPI processor grid
Lattice spacing in x,y,z = 4 4 4
Created 4 atoms
Replicating atoms ...
  orthogonal box = (0 0 0) to (4 4 4)
  1 by 1 by 2 MPI processor grid
  4 atoms
WARNING: Resetting reneighboring criteria during minimization (../min.cpp:173)
Setting up minimization ...
Memory usage per processor = 2.40372 Mbytes
Step PotEng Lx Ly Lz Press Pxx Pyy Pzz eatoms 
       0   -13.417787            4            4            4     29590.11     29590.11     29590.11     29590.11   -13.417787 
      10   -13.439104         4.04         4.04         4.04    5853.9553    5853.9553    5853.9553    5853.9553   -13.439104 
      14       -13.44         4.05         4.05         4.05     2.726913     2.726913     2.726913     2.726913       -13.44 
Loop time of 0.0287241 on 2 procs for 14 steps with 4 atoms

Minimization stats:
  Stopping criterion = linesearch alpha is zero
  Energy initial, next-to-last, final = 
        -13.4177872966     -13.4399999525     -13.4399999525
  Force two-norm initial, final = 3.54599 0.000335006
  Force max component initial, final = 3.54599 0.000335006
  Final line search alpha, max atom move = 0.0625 2.09379e-05
  Iterations, force evaluations = 14 19

Pair  time (%) = 0.00206506 (7.18931)
Neigh time (%) = 0 (0)
Comm  time (%) = 0.00481999 (16.7803)
Outpt time (%) = 0.000162005 (0.564006)
Other time (%) = 0.021677 (75.4664)

Nlocal:    2 ave 2 max 2 min
Histogram: 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nghost:    603 ave 603 max 603 min
Histogram: 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neighs:    140 ave 162 max 118 min
Histogram: 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Total # of neighbors = 280
Ave neighs/atom = 70
Neighbor list builds = 0
Dangerous builds = 0
Total energy (eV) = -13.439999952539944061;
Number of atoms = 4;
Lattice constant (Angstoms) = 4.049999999999998046;
Cohesive energy (eV) = -3.3599999881349860154;
All done!

NAMOT Pre-Release 2.2.0-pre4 In OSX 10.8 (Maybe Older Versions)

Sunday, January 13th, 2013

A recent visit to the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at SUNY Albany inspired a few new DNA ideas that I decided would be greatly simplified by having NAMOT available again for design. Having failed at the base install of the NAMOT 2 version and, unfortunately, not having NAMOT available in Fink for a simple installation, the solution became to build the pre-release from scratch. Ignoring the many errors one encounters while walking through an OSX/Xcode/Fink/X11 bootstrap, the final procedure worked well and without major problem. As usual, the error messages at varied steps are provided below because, I assume, those messages are what you’re searching for when you find your way here.

0. Required Installations

You’ll need the following installed for this particular build. I believe XCode is the only thing that you’ll have to pay for (if you don’t already have it. I seem to remember paying $5 through the App Store).

1. XCode

The OSX Developer Suite – developer.apple.com/xcode

2. XQuartz

An OSX (X.Org) X Window System – xquartz.macosforge.org/landing/

3. Fink

An OSX port program for a host of Unix codes and libraries – www.finkproject.org

3a. GSL

The GNU Scientific (C and C++) Libraries – www.gnu.org/software/gsl. This will be installed with Fink.

3b. LessTif

An OSF/Motif clone (made available for OSX through Fink) – lesstif.sourceforge.net. This will be installed with Fink.

4. NAMOT2.2.0-pre4

The -pre4 is currently available (from 2003) from sourceforge.net/projects/namot/files/. I did not try -pre3 and had no luck with the official 2 release.

And, with that…

1. XCode

Blindly follow the install procedure. Several steps below deal with working around the default install locations (specifically, /sw).

2. XQuartz

If you don’t have XQuartz installed, you’re configure step…

cd Downloads
cd namot-2.2.0-pre4
./configure 

will produce the following error…

checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
checking whether build environment is sane... yes
checking for gawk... no
checking for mawk... no
checking for nawk... no
checking for awk... awk
...
creating libtool
checking for X... no
checking for main in -lX11... no
NAMOT requires Xwindows

Blindly follow the XQuartz install process. After the installations, you’ll receive the same error as above. The –x-libraries= and –x-includes= additions to configure below direct the script to the proper libraries and includes.

./configure --x-libraries=/usr/X11/lib/ --x-includes=/usrX11/include/

Hopefully, you’ll find yourself past the first install problem and onto the second problem.

checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
checking whether build environment is sane... yes
checking for gawk... no
checking for mawk... no
checking for nawk... no
checking for awk... awk
...
creating libtool
checking for X... libraries /usr/X11/lib/, headers /usrX11/include/
checking for gethostbyname... yes
checking for connect... yes
checking for remove... yes
checking for shmat... yes
checking for IceConnectionNumber in -lICE... yes
checking for main in -lX11... yes
checking for main in -lgslcblas... no
NAMOT requires GNU Scientific Library

3. Fink

The next two codes that need to be installed are the GNU Scientific Libraries and LessTif, both of which are much easier to install using Fink. It is generally useful for many other codes as well, so a good program for any computational chemist to have on hand. The install should be non-problematic despite having to build it from source in 10.6 – 10.8 (as of January 2013). If you build with all the default settings, you’ll have no trouble after.

cd Downloads
cd fink-0.34.4
./bootstrap 

I chose the default settings throughout.

Fink must be installed and run with superuser (root) privileges. Fink can automatically try to become root when it's run from a user account. Since you're currently running this script as a normal user, the method you choose will also be used immediately for this script. Available methods:

(1)	Use sudo
(2)	Use su
(3)	None, fink must be run as root

Choose a method: [1] 

...

You should now have a working Fink installation in '/sw'. You still need package descriptions if you want to compile packages yourself. You can get them by running either of the commands: 'fink selfupdate-rsync', to update via rsync (generally preferred); or 'fink selfupdate-cvs', to update via CVS (more likely to work through a firewall).

Run '. /sw/bin/init.sh' to set up this terminal session environment to use Fink. To make the software installed by Fink available in all of your future terminal shells, add '. /sw/bin/init.sh' to the init script '.profile' or '.bash_profile' in your home directory. The program /sw/bin/pathsetup.sh can help with this. Enjoy.

Then you run the final step in Fink below:

/sw/bin/pathsetup.sh

Which will produce the following two pop-ups notifying you of shell modifications.

3a. GSL

With the install of Fink, you need to install GSL and LessTif. If you try to install either immediately after installation…

fink install gsl

…you’ll receive the following error:

Password:
Scanning package description files..........
Information about 305 packages read in 0 seconds.
no package found for "gsl"
Failed: no package found for specification 'gsl'!

Required after the installation is a fink selfupdate.

fink selfupdate

As usual, follow the default settings…

fink needs you to choose a SelfUpdateMethod.

(1)	cvs
(2)	Stick to point releases
(3)	rsync

Choose an update method [3] 
/usr/bin/find /sw/fink -name CVS -type d -print0 | xargs -0 /bin/rm -rf
fink is setting your default update method to rsync
...
Updating the list of locally available binary packages.
Scanning dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386
New package: dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386/base/base-files_1.9.13-1_darwin-i386.deb
New package: dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386/base/fink-mirrors_0.34.4.1-1_darwin-i386.deb

Which then leads to a successful GSL install.

fink install gsl

Producing the following output…

Information about 12051 packages read in 1 seconds.
The package 'gsl' will be built and installed.
Reading build dependency for gsl-1.15-1...
Reading dependency for gsl-1.15-1...
Reading runtime dependency for gsl-1.15-1...
Reading dependency for gsl-shlibs-1.15-1...
...
Updating the list of locally available binary packages.
Scanning dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386
New package: dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386/sci/gsl-shlibs_1.15-1_darwin-i386.deb
New package: dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386/sci/gsl_1.15-1_darwin-i386.deb

Attempting a fresh build after the GSL step…

./configure --x-libraries=/usr/X11/lib/ --x-includes=/usrX11/include/

…then still produces the following error:

checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
checking whether build environment is sane... yes
checking for gawk... no
checking for mawk... no
checking for nawk... no
checking for awk... awk
...
checking for IceConnectionNumber in -lICE... yes
checking for main in -lX11... yes
checking for main in -lgslcblas... no
NAMOT requires GNU Scientific Library

As mentioned above, there are a few redirects that need to be made after the XCode / Fink install to put libraries and includes where, in this case, NAMOT expects them. To perform this task, we’ll be using symbolic links.

sudo ln -s /sw/include/gsl /usr/include/
sudo ln -s /sw/lib/libgsl* /usr/lib

Now attempting a build…

./configure --x-libraries=/usr/X11/lib/ --x-includes=/usrX11/include

Gets you past the GSL issue.

checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
checking whether build environment is sane... yes
checking for gawk... no
checking for mawk... no
checking for nawk... no
checking for awk... awk
…
checking for IceConnectionNumber in -lICE... yes
checking for main in -lX11... yes
checking for main in -lgslcblas... yes
checking for main in -lgsl... yes
checking for XShmCreateImage in -lXext... yes
checking for main in -lXt... yes
checking for main in -lXm... no
NAMOT requires Motif...try LessTif(http://www.lesstif.org)

3b. LessTif

The LessTif symbolic links work the same as the GSL symbolic links. This fink install may take a while.

fink install lesstif

Output below…

Information about 12051 packages read in 1 seconds.
The package 'lesstif' will be built and installed.
Reading build dependency for lesstif-0.95.2-4...
Reading dependency for lesstif-0.95.2-4...
Reading runtime dependency for lesstif-0.95.2-4...
...
Setting up lesstif (0.95.2-4) ...
Clearing dependency_libs of .la files being installed

Updating the list of locally available binary packages.
Scanning dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386
New package: dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386/x11/app-defaults_20010814-12_darwin-i386.deb
New package: dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386/x11/lesstif-bin_0.95.2-4_darwin-i386.deb
New package: dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386/x11/lesstif-shlibs_0.95.2-4_darwin-i386.deb
New package: dists/stable/main/binary-darwin-i386/x11/lesstif_0.95.2-4_darwin-i386.deb
./configure --x-libraries=/usr/X11/lib/ --x-includes=/usrX11/include/

But, unfortunately, the LessTif libraries are not in the expected locations.

checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
checking whether build environment is sane... yes
checking for gawk... no
checking for mawk... no
checking for nawk... no
checking for awk... awk
...
checking for IceConnectionNumber in -lICE... yes
checking for main in -lX11... yes
checking for main in -lgslcblas... yes
checking for main in -lgsl... yes
checking for XShmCreateImage in -lXext... yes
checking for main in -lXt... yes
checking for main in -lXm... no
NAMOT requires Motif...try LessTif(http://www.lesstif.org)

So we add the symbolic links…

sudo ln -s /sw/lib/libXm.* /usr/lib
sudo ln -s /sw/include/Xm /usr/include

Which, finally, runs configure…

./configure --x-libraries=/usr/X11/lib/ --x-includes=/usrX11/include/

…with no errors.

checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
checking whether build environment is sane... yes
checking for gawk... no
checking for mawk... no
checking for nawk... no
checking for awk... awk
...
config.status: creating docs/demos/curve/Makefile
config.status: creating docs/demos/dit/Makefile
config.status: creating docs/demos/Makefile
config.status: creating config.h
config.status: executing depfiles commands

NOTE: The make step with Python 2.6 produces the following error below. I did not diagnose this beyond the failure to build under 10.6. OSX 10.8 comes with Python 2.7, which did not produce this problem (I’m assuming this is the origin of the problem).

make

…will produce the following error at the pngwriter.c step.

/bin/sh ../libtool --mode=compile gcc -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -I. -I. -I..    -DLIB_HOME="\"/usr/local/share/namot\"" -DHELP_FILE_DIR="\"/usr/local/share/namot\"" -I/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/include/python2.6 -I/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib/python2.6/config -g -O2 -c -o _pynamot_la-pngwriter.lo `test -f 'pngwriter.c' || echo './'`pngwriter.c
gcc -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -I. -I. -I.. -DLIB_HOME=\"/usr/local/share/namot\" -DHELP_FILE_DIR=\"/usr/local/share/namot\" -I/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/include/python2.6 -I/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.6/lib/python2.6/config -g -O2 -c pngwriter.c -MT _pynamot_la-pngwriter.lo -MD -MP -MF .deps/_pynamot_la-pngwriter.TPlo  -fno-common -DPIC -o _pynamot_la-pngwriter.lo
pngwriter.c: In function 'dump_PNG':
pngwriter.c:28: error: 'png_structp' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:28: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
pngwriter.c:28: error: for each function it appears in.)
pngwriter.c:28: error: expected ';' before 'png_ptr'
pngwriter.c:29: error: 'png_infop' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:29: error: expected ';' before 'info_ptr'
pngwriter.c:30: error: 'png_byte' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:30: error: 'row_pointers' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:30: error: expected expression before ')' token
pngwriter.c:31: error: 'png_text' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:31: error: expected ';' before 'text_ptr'
pngwriter.c:39: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function 'memset'
pngwriter.c:39: error: 'text_ptr' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:47: error: 'png_ptr' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:47: error: 'PNG_LIBPNG_VER_STRING' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:48: error: 'png_voidp' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:57: error: 'info_ptr' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:60: error: 'png_infopp' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:82: error: 'PNG_COLOR_TYPE_RGB' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:82: error: 'PNG_INTERLACE_ADAM7' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:83: error: 'PNG_COMPRESSION_TYPE_DEFAULT' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:83: error: 'PNG_FILTER_TYPE_DEFAULT' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:85: error: 'PNG_sRGB_INTENT_ABSOLUTE' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:90: error: 'PNG_TEXT_COMPRESSION_NONE' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:93: error: 'PNG_TEXT_COMPRESSION_zTXt' undeclared (first use in this function)
pngwriter.c:104: error: expected expression before ')' token
make[2]: *** [_pynamot_la-pngwriter.lo] Error 1
make[1]: *** [all-recursive] Error 1
make: *** [all] Error 2

The build on 10.8 continues as below, with a few warnings about the symbolic link usage that do not seem to affect the program usability (or continued build).

make

Results below…

make  all-recursive
Making all in src
source='namot_wrap.c' object='_pynamot_la-namot_wrap.lo' libtool=yes \
	depfile='.deps/_pynamot_la-namot_wrap.Plo' tmpdepfile='.deps/_pynamot_la-namot_wrap.TPlo' \
	depmode=gcc3 /bin/sh ../depcomp \
	/bin/sh ../libtool --mode=compile gcc -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -I. -I. -I..    -DLIB_HOME="\"/usr/local/share/namot\"" -DHELP_FILE_DIR="\"/usr/local/share/namot\"" -I/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/include/python2.7 -I/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/config -g -O2 -c -o _pynamot_la-namot_wrap.lo `test -f 'namot_wrap.c' || echo './'`namot_wrap.c

...

*** Warning: linker path does not have real file for library -lXm.
*** I have the capability to make that library automatically link in when
*** you link to this library.  But I can only do this if you have a
*** shared version of the library, which you do not appear to have
*** because I did check the linker path looking for a file starting
*** with libXm and none of the candidates passed a file format test
*** using a file magic. Last file checked: /sw/lib/libXm.la

*** Warning: linker path does not have real file for library -lgsl.
*** I have the capability to make that library automatically link in when
*** you link to this library.  But I can only do this if you have a
*** shared version of the library, which you do not appear to have
*** because I did check the linker path looking for a file starting
*** with libgsl and none of the candidates passed a file format test
*** using a file magic. Last file checked: /sw/lib/libgsl.la

*** Warning: linker path does not have real file for library -lgslcblas.
*** I have the capability to make that library automatically link in when
*** you link to this library.  But I can only do this if you have a
*** shared version of the library, which you do not appear to have
*** because I did check the linker path looking for a file starting
*** with libgslcblas and none of the candidates passed a file format test
*** using a file magic. Last file checked: /sw/lib/libgslcblas.la

*** Warning: libtool could not satisfy all declared inter-library
*** dependencies of module _pynamot.  Therefore, libtool will create
*** a static module, that should work as long as the dlopening
*** application is linked with the -dlopen flag.

...

Making all in libs
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
Making all in docs
Making all in helpfiles
make[3]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
Making all in demos
Making all in 6way
make[4]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
Making all in bending
make[4]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
Making all in cube
make[4]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
Making all in curve
make[4]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
Making all in dit
make[4]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
make[4]: Nothing to be done for `all-am'.
make[3]: Nothing to be done for `all-am'.
Making all in etc
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `all'.

Finally, the install…

make install

Which produces the following:

Making install in src
/bin/sh ../mkinstalldirs /usr/local/lib
 /bin/sh ../libtool --mode=install /usr/bin/install -c  _pynamot.la /usr/local/lib/_pynamot.la
/usr/bin/install -c .libs/_pynamot.lai /usr/local/lib/_pynamot.la
/usr/bin/install -c .libs/_pynamot.a /usr/local/lib/_pynamot.a
ranlib /usr/local/lib/_pynamot.a
chmod 644 /usr/local/lib/_pynamot.a
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Libraries have been installed in:
   /usr/local/lib

If you ever happen to want to link against installed libraries
in a given directory, LIBDIR, you must either use libtool, and
specify the full pathname of the library, or use the `-LLIBDIR'
flag during linking and do at least one of the following:
   - add LIBDIR to the `DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH' environment variable
     during execution

See any operating system documentation about shared libraries for
more information, such as the ld(1) and ld.so(8) manual pages.
...
/bin/sh ../mkinstalldirs /usr/local/share/namot
 /usr/bin/install -c -m 644 Namot2.512 /usr/local/share/namot/Namot2.512
 /usr/bin/install -c -m 644 Namot2.600 /usr/local/share/namot/Namot2.600
 /usr/bin/install -c -m 644 Namot2.700 /usr/local/share/namot/Namot2.700
 /usr/bin/install -c -m 644 icon1.xv /usr/local/share/namot/icon1.xv
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-exec-am'.
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-data-am'.

With luck, your launching of NAMOT will open XQuartz and produce a fully operational NAMOT session.

namot

And, for more assistance with producing DNA files for GROMACS, consider the Modifications To The ffG53a6.rtp And ffG53a5.rtp Residue Topology Files Required For Using GROMOS96-NAMOT-GROMACS v1, sed-Based Script For Converting NAMOT And NAMOT2 DNA Output To GROMOS96 Format For GROMACS Topology Generation v1, and sed-Based Script For Converting NAMOT And NAMOT2 DNA Output To ffAMBER Format For GROMACS Topology Generation v1 pages on this blog.

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